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Denny Through to final

Saturday, 26 July 2014 | Cody Lynch

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Queenslander Matt Denny easily qualified for the men’s discus final while Filoi Aokuso (NSW) improved her lifetime best three times in the discus final placing seventh to provide the highlights of Day 4 of the World Junior Championships in Eugene, Oregon.

Denny, the World Youth champion, progressed to the final with a huge 62.38m on his first throw in the second qualification group. The Queenslander was keen to make up for a disappointing effort yesterday when he failed to qualify for the hammer final.

"I came in with a plan to make amends for yesterday. I didn't let nerves get the better of me. I am in form to go further than my PB and my goal like anyone’s is to win. I am going to pull out whatever I can.” said Denny.

Denny will be joined in the final by teammate Mitch Cooper (Qld), who after a shaky start, threw a lifetime best of 59.31m on his third throw to go into the final ranked 8th overall.

Croatian Martin Markovic led the qualifiers with 63.71m, while favourite Sven Martin Skagestad from Norway qualified with 59.79, only the fifth longest throw of the session. 

In the women’s discus final, Aokuso’s opening throw of 53.61m, set the scene for what was to come, by exceeding the lifetime best she set in the qualification round by 28cm.

Her third throw went beyond that mark too, before launching yet another best of 53.92m on her penultimate throw. The 18 year-old has aspirations to be an Olympian declared she wanted to be "as half as good as Dani Samuels”. 

The competition was won by Izabela Da Silva from Brazil with a world junior leading throw of 58.03m.

18 year-old Joel Baden (Vic) placed eighth in the men’s high jump final with a leap of 2.17m, his second best ever. 

In the men’s 5000m final, Morgan McDonald (Vic) placed tenth in a time of 14.10.08s, less than one second outside his lifetime best.

In the high jump, Cassie Purdon (Qld) sailed over 1.85m and into the high jump final. The leap was a new lifetime best, the second in two weeks for the Queenslander who declared she was “on a roll”.

The men’s 4 x 100m team of Josh Clarke (NSW), Jesse Usoilli (Tas), Jacob Despard (Tas) and Anthony Collum (NSW)  ran 40.18s to progress to tomorrow’s final (Sunday AEST).

Australian is placed 9th on overall top 8 placings, behind top ranked US.

Session reports of Day 4

Aussies in action on Day 5

Session commences at 7.30 am AEST Sunday 27 July

  • Women's 100m hurdles semi-final - Kat Hunt (NSW)
  • Men’s Pole Vault final - Jack Hicking (Vic)
  • Women's Triple Jump final - Aliyah Johnstone (Qld)
  • Men’s Discus final - Matt Denny  (Qld) Mitch Cooper (Qld)
  • Men’s 4 x 400m - James Kaluschke QLD, Dan Forsyth QLD, James Kermond NSW, Christian Foster NSW Sam Reiser VIC Joshua Robinson QLD
  • Women’s 4x4 heats - Ella Solin WA, Courtney Geraghty QLD, Samantha Lind TAS, Georgia Wassall NSW, Georgia Griffith VIC, Emily Lawson VIC
  • Men’s 4x1 final
  • Men’s 800m Semi-finals - Luke Mathews (Vic)
  • Women’s - 3000m steeple final - Stella Radford (Vic)

Evening Session Report

Filoi Aokuso (NSW) improved her lifetime best three times in the discus final, placing seventh to provide the highlight of the evening session on Day 4 at the IAAF World Junior Championships.

"I am so excited. I placed seventh, but to me I placed first.” said the national junior champion.

Aokuso’s opening throw of 53.61m, exceeded the lifetime best she set in qualifying by 28cm and provided confidence for her remaining throws. ”I was pretty pumped. From then on I didn’t doubt myself.” she said.

A subdued second throw of 50.87m followed, before her third throw of 53.85m, another lifetime best, secured her three further attempts and placed her sixth.

The Mick Moore-coached athlete’s penultimate throw again improved her best, this time to 53.92m, with the 18 year-old admitting "I felt like I had it from the moment I spun. I knew I could throw that far.”

The 19 year-old says she aspires to be "as half as good as Dani Samuels”, before declaring 

"My goal is to make an Olympic team. After every competition I want to feel successful in my own eyes."

Her full series was 53.61m, 50.87m, 53.85m, 52.45m, 53.92m, 47.93m

The fan of music singer Beyonce, used one of the singer’s tracks to sum up her performance. Flawless.

 

The competition was won by Izabela Da Silva from Brazil with a world junior leading throw of 58.03m.

In the men’s 5000m final, Morgan McDonald (Vic) placed tenth in a time of 14.10.08s, less than one second outside his lifetime best.

"I'm pretty happy overall. I'll take a lot from that. It was the toughest race tactically I've been in my whole life.”

“The pack split into two so I thought I had to do something.” said McDonald who started to push the pace from 2000m out from the finish.

"I’m going to take a few weeks off and head to Wisconsin to start a new life.” said the college-bound McDonald.

The men’s 4 x 100m team of Josh Clarke (NSW), Jesse Usoilli (Tas), Jacob Despard (Tas) and Anthony Collum (NSW)  ran 40.18s to progress to tomorrow’s final (Sunday AEST).

100m semi-finalist Clarke got out to quick start on the first leg, proving a crisp change to Usoilli (Tas). Usoilli tired towards the end of the back straight run and the change with his Tasmanian counterpart only just made it into the zone. Despard, pulled up to make the exchange. 

Despard charged around the bend and made a perfect change to anchor-man Collum, who powered through the line to cross in fourth, but progress on times. It was the third fastest time by an Australian team at a World Juniors. Only the teams of 2012 and 2006 have been faster. 

Despard knows where the improvement lies ahead of the final. "We will work on the change with Jesse and I for the final."

Australia’s best performance in the 4 x 100m was in Sydney 1996 when the national team placed third. 

Joel Baden (Vic) placed 8th in the men’s high jump final with a leap of 2.17m, his second best ever. 

The Victorian had a clean slate through that height, but was unable to match his lifetime best of 2.20m at the next height.

It was the 18 year-olds second best ever jumper, but he was disappointed. "I am mentally shattered. I was happy with my first jumps but lost technique at 2.20. I lost my last few strides on the curve"

The women’s 4 x100m team of Hana Basic (Vic), Audrey Kyriacou (NSW), Tavleen Singh (NSW) and Larissa Chambers (Qld) placed 3rd in their heat but their time of 45.54s was not enough to progress to the final.

Basic, the national 100m champion, led the women off with a strong run before passing to long jumper Kyriacou who ran a strong back straight.

The change with Singh was not as clean as the first but the Sydney-sider rallied around the bend. Chambers ran the anchor leg hard as the team placed 10th overall.

Kyriacou best summed up the performance saying "As a team we went really well. There’s so much going on out there. Together as a team we got the baton across the line and didn’t drop it.”

Ella Solin (WA) ran 60.62 in the semifinals of the 400m hurdles to place 17th overall. The West Australian said "I'm happy I made it to the semi-final but would have liked a better performance”.

Flash Quotes

Josh Clarke
"It felt good. Better than some of my heat runs. My change with Jesse was nice and crisp"

Jesse Usoilli
"I was happy with my change with Josh but got tired legs at the end so my change with JD wasn't fantastic. It's a big improvement from our last meet."

Jacob Despard
"We will work on the change with Jesse and I for the final. My change with Collum was perfect."

Anthony Collum
"I thought the change went really well. I just focused on my lane and ran as fast as I could."

Larissa Chambers
"I think its was good considering it’s our first run as a team. I thought my anchor leg was good. I’ve had some ankle issues but they turned out fine. It’s not a relay without a few dramas"

Tavllen Singh
"I’m disappointed. All our changes in practice were good. I’m not sure what happened. I had a strong run around the been though. It was a good experience"

Audrey Kyriacou
"As a team we went really well. There’s so much going on out there. Together as a team we got the baton across the line and didn’t drop it."

Hana Basic
"I’m obviously disappointed but I’m happy with our run. I’m happy with our first change. We tried our best."

 

 

Morning Session Report

Queenslanders Matt Denny and Mitchell Cooper qualified for the men’s discus final and a lifetime best by Cassie Purdon in the high jump, were the highlights of the morning session on Day 4 of the IAAF World Junior Championships.

Both men threw over the automatic qualifying mark of 59.00m to rank 2nd and 8th overall and progress to tomorrow’s final (Sunday AEST).

Denny, the World Youth champion, qualified for the final with a huge 62.38m on his first throw in the second qualification group. The Queenslander was keen to make up for a disappointing effort yesterday when he failed to qualify for the hammer final.

"I came in with a plan to make amends for yesterday. I didn't let nerves get the better of me. I am in form to go further than my PB.” said Denny whose best throw of 63.66m was set in Brisbane in March.

Croatian Martin Markovic led the qualifiers with 63.71m, while favourite Sven Martin Skagestad from Norway qualified with 59.79m, only fifth longest throw of the session.

Denny has his eyes on the big prize.

"My goal like anyone’s is to win. I am going to pull out whatever I can.”

In the first group, Cooper, after a shaky start, progressed to the final by throwing a lifetime best of 59.31m on his third and final throw.

"That wasn't the way I planned it, but I got there.” said Cooper whose first two sub-par efforts of 53.38m and 55.14m, had him languishing in 9th and looking like an early end to his championships. The Queenslander regathered for his final throw and then launched the qualifier which was 24 cm further than his previous best mark.

Cooper, who attends the University of Kansas, was pleased with his approach to the clutch throw.

"I went in completely relaxed and shut out everything. To be honest I can’t remember the throw. I remember seeing it flying and feeling good.”

"I got the PB 59.31 and I’m stoked. The big goal is to medal. Go for a big throw early” he said.

In the high jump, Cassie Purdon (Qld) sailed over 1.85m and into the high jump final. The leap was a new lifetime best, the second in two weeks for the Queenslander who declared she was “on a roll”.

Purdon had a nervous start to the competition with a miss at 1.70m in her first attempt of the competition.

“I missed the first, which freaked me out a bit, but I got kinda angry and cleared the next by a fair bit.”

Purdon, one of seven to clear the automatic qualifying height, was looking forward to the final. "Bring it on. I'm going to give it my best” she said.

Earlier, Nicola McDermott (NSW), in the second group, was unable to negotiate 1.82m and failed to advance. She had three straight clearances at earlier heights and was disappointed by her performance. "It's the lowest I've done this trip. At 1.82m I didn't have the correct position. I gave it my all though."

In the men’s 800m, Luke Mathews (Vic) was a confident heat winner, automatically progressing through to tomorrow’s semi-finals. Mathews’ time of 1.50.76 came in a rough two-lapper, but the Victorian wasn’t phased saying, "I’m a 6 foot guy so no-one as going to push me around.”

Mathews second lap was impressive, as he held off all challengers.

“A 54 second lap and I claimed the win. I am so happy with that. I must do the same in the semi. It’s not party time yet though. It’s still business.” said Mathews.

Jordan Makins (WA) placed fourth in his heat in a time of 1.51.01s, but it wasn’t enough to progress, placing 27th overall.

"I almost got boxed in on that first lap. I tried to hold firm and give it everything I had."

"I gave it my best shot, but there’s still a lot to come in the next few years.” said Makins.

Kat Hunt (NSW) qualified for the semi-finals in the 100m hurdles in style, placing second in her heat with a new lifetime best of 13.66 (wind +1.6).

Watched on by personal coach Ron Bendell, Hunt was thrilled with her performance, which ranks her 13th overall going into the next round.

"I did some jumps, got into the blocks and thought ‘Do it now or never'. I got to the first hurdle ahead. That felt really good. The crowd was cheering and I could hear people shouting my name. The atmosphere was just amazing. When I crossed the line I thought, wow!” said Hunt.

Anna Laman (NSW) progressed to the final of the women’s 1500m as one of the fastest non-automatic qualifiers. Laman’s time of 4.18.89 was her second-fastest of the year, and was pleased to achieve her goal.

"My aim was to make the final so now I am really really happy."

"I am really happy with this because I have had a bumpy few months. It was a pretty good race. I really pushed and tried to stay with the leaders.” said Laman.

Rhys Stein (NSW) threw 62.68m in the men’s javelin qualification but was unable to progress, placing 11th in his group.

In the first event of the morning session, 10000m walk, Nathan Brill (Vic) placed 17th in a season’s best 42.54.39s, but the World Walking Cup representative was not satisfied with his effort.

"I am pretty disappointed. My legs felt heavy as hell.”

Brill had gone out hard with the leaders in the first five laps, and admitted “that was a shock to the system. I think I overstretched it.”, before fading over the second half.

"You have to put up with your performance. You get what you get.” said Brill.

Teammate Jesse Osborne (Vic) has been battling leg problems and was gallant in finishing in 33rd place with 49.53.38s.

“I have been in the pool for 10 weeks and I was going to finish no matter what I had to go through. I’ll be back. I’m hungry to get back home and get right” said the Victorian.

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